Ecological disturbance caused due to Climate Change is behind the Uttarakhand Tragedy!

The latest Calamity in Uttarakhand has once again turned the spotlight of the impact of Ecological disturbance and the raising concerns on climate change in our society. On February 7, a portion of Nanda Devi glacier broke off, leading to severe floods that washed away villages and damaged power plants. Around 200 people are still missing, and many of them are now feared dead.

States and the Centre need to take a long-term approach on infrastructure project-planning. This will have to start with the mapping of vulnerable areas and choosing the least disruptive, least environmentally-exacting course of action, even if it means dedicating significantly higher resources.

Scientists are yet to conclude what caused the sudden flooding of the Dhauli Ganga river in Uttarakhand’s Chamoli district on Sunday—150 people have been reported missing and the entire Tapovan hydel project has been washed away. Experts cited in various media reports, however, say the blame squarely rests with the failure to draw a balance between fragile ecosystems & topography and development imperatives, compounded by climate-change effects. While ‘glacial lake outburst flooding’ triggered by a recently reported avalanche in the region has also been suggested, some experts are sceptical since no big glacial lakes have been mapped there.

Even so, the possibility that warming could have led to formation of hitherto undetected proglacial lakes would indicate some role played by climate change, which could have been exacerbated by development projects upsetting a topography that is sensitive to what may seem as minor changes.

In July 2020, experts had warned about melting of glaciers in the Nanda Devi region. A study by IIT Kanpur and Dehradun-based Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology shows nearly 26 square kilometres of the glaciated area of Nanda Devi region was lost in 37 years.

“Also study reveals that the glaciers of the valley lost 26 km² (10%) of the glaciated area between 1980 and 2017. The total glacierized area in 2017 is 217 km², which is 26% of the total area. However, during the same periods (1980-2017) the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) of the glaciers fluctuated between 5200 and 5700 m asl (meters above sea level). The present study suggests that the glaciers in the region have responded to deprived precipitation conditions since 1980,” the study published in July 2020 said.

The shrinking of the world’s ice is now following the worst-case climate change scenario outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; a study by researchers at the University of Leeds has found that the world has lost a whopping 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017.

For perspective, that is over 1.2 trillion tonnes of ice lost per year over a little more than two decades, while the ice-loss figure was 800 billion tonnes till then. Various experts, both government and private sector, cited in an article in the Times of India, have voiced concern about climate change effects in the Himalayan ecosystem, saying there are clear signs of temperature increases that add to the risk of glacier-related flooding.

Against this backdrop, the construction of hydel projects, and related development activity, in vulnerable regions needs closer scrutiny and careful weighing against alternative models. In the 2013 floods in the state, scientists had raised questions over the assessment of environmental impact of such projects and their role in exacerbating natural disasters.

The role of unplanned development was also flagged in Kerala floods of 2018 and the Kashmir floods of 2015. Indeed, a Supreme Court appointed committee, as per media reports, had warned against hydel projects over an altitude of 2,000 metres, saying such developments could result in disasters; it had recommended the cancellation of 23 out of 24 projects under way at the time.

Without reassessing the environmental cost of development—more so in hilly regions—and factoring in much-earlier-than-anticipated effects of climate change, India is likely to see more such disasters. States and the Centre need to take a long-term approach on infrastructure project-planning. This will have to start with mapping of vulnerable areas and choosing the least disruptive, least environmentally-exacting course of action, even if it means dedicating significantly higher resources.

As India tries to change course on energy production, it will also need to aggressively push a climate-forward agenda for the rest of the globe. Reducing the carbon output of the national economy may be ‘doing our bit’, but the time for piecemeal action is long over.

How Econaur is contributing to making Sustainable Buildings

What we do and how we do it? How Econaur the only green building platform works ?

If you still don’t know what exactly we do, well don’t worry here you will understand what we are doing here and how we do it.

What we do?

Econaur is India’s first online aggregator platform that provides one-stop solutions for green and energy-efficient buildings by providing the materials, products, technology, and expert guidance. Econaur is the only green buildings platform.

It has made an easy online green building platform for everyone who needs to know about sustainable and green construction and also can contribute their ideas, projects, and vision about what further can be done in sustainable construction.

Sustainable Product Companies now have an easy online platform where they can not only showcase their products but also find out that about the new sustainable technology & projects undergoing in the market by connecting with community of green building professionals can find out what the user needs for a sustainable construction.

Our vision is simple, we know that tons of resources are getting wasted in construction everyday and if we go wasting the resources at the same speed than sooner we are going to extinct our resources and become endangered. So our efforts are towards raising the awareness about sustainability and green construction, which is an alternative solution for using resources in the most efficient manner.

Our intention of having a community of stakeholders, architects, consultants, and manufacturing companies is this only, so under a single Econaur’s green buildings platform anybody can communicate with anyone and know what more can be achieved in sustainable construction. We believe in working together, and no better way can be there to connect every member from the building industry at a single platform.

How we do it?

The major thing we keep in mind before showcasing any information or product on our platform is that, the product doesn’t have any harmful impact on the environment. As long as the product is sustainable and minimize the harmful effects on the environment, we are always whole-heartedly open to showcase the product.

Even if you want to share any information or post anything related to green building, new sustainable products or about environment then also we give you a community article section where you can share anything related. Not only you can share but come to know about more sustainable innovations going on all around the world.

We personally too share regular content in our blog section about new technologies, construction products and news about the green building.

Perhaps you ask, ‘How can I afford green building materials?’Although you may be on a tight budget, there are creative ways to build a green home or office without compromising quality. We’re aware of the challenges and invite you to take advantage of our expertise in order to get the look and quality you want, at a price you can afford. We’ve done it with our own home and with hundreds of others — and we’re confident we can help you, too.

How do eco-friendly and sustainable products compare in cost to toxic products?

As a rule, natural and non-toxic products (e.g. wood, bamboo, cork, wool carpet, natural linoleum, marble/granite/limestone/porcelain, natural finishes, etc.) tend to be our favorites. They are sometimes more expensive than other products initially, but that’s not the whole story.

Sustainable products tend to:

  • last longer
  • wear better
  • clean easier
  • smell better
  • create a pleasing, healthier environment for residents
  • be biodegradable

Non-sustainable products, on the other hand, tend to:

  • be short-lived
  • require more maintenance
  • exhibit toxic and foul smells for many months, with some out-gassing undetected for years
  • compromise the health of individuals and the environment
  • provide only short-term pleasure
  • sit in landfills almost forever

In the long run, the life-cycle costs of sustainable products are usually less expensive. Plus they bring greater satisfaction during installation and for generations of use.

Many of our clients forced us to find natural products that would compete in price with cheaper, unnatural products. This was a challenge, but we did it.

A new trend

Non-toxic products used to be more expensive to manufacture than their toxic counterparts. This was due, in part, to the newness of the products and the small numbers of people using them. This trend has changed in the last few years; prices have fallen due to the widening market and the improvement of manufacturing techniques.

Demand for environmentally-friendly products is at an all-time high, not only in the building market but in the clothing and food markets as well. As the world wakes up to the lasting value and joy of using healthy building materials, we fully expect this trend to continue for a long time to come.

In addition to understanding the nature of eco-products, we’re also involved on the local level in using these products to help build a sustainable future. We promote healthy building environments in several ways including belonging to trade and environmental associations, sponsoring conferences, earth days and eco-fairs, donating a portion of our earnings to non-profit organizations that create peace and better the environment, and consulting with clients nationwide who personally test and use green building products.

Comments and Suggestions 

If you still have any question or query about anything which is troubling you then you let us know. Also if you have any suggestions about any new sustainable product or new technology then also let us know. We appreciate your feedback.

Econaur listed as Best Sustainability Blog on feedspot.

Celebrate Green Building week from 23rd Sept to 29th Sept with Econaur!

Buildings and construction are responsible for 39% of global energy-related carbon emissions. World Green Building Week, taking place from September 23 to 29, this year aims to raise awareness of the carbon emissions from all stages of a building’s lifecycle. ECONAUR is Celebrating the Green Building week and the campaigns for the week with a specific day wise themes.

Heating, powering, and cooling buildings (in-use) contributes 28% to global energy-related carbon emissions, while 11% of these emissions refer to carbon released during the construction process and material manufacturing (embodied emissions). Themed #BuildingLife this year, World Green Building Week is seeking to explore how to create a green, healthy, and climate-resilient built environment for all.

To date, the building and construction industry’s focus has been on operational emissions and how buildings actually perform in-use.

However, in order to fully decarbonize by 2050 to keep global warming to below 1.5 degrees, the building and construction sector must also tackle embodied emissions from the entire building lifecycle, according to the World Green Building Council (World GBC), Econaur being India’s First Integrated Platform for Green Building Solutions working to promote the Sustainable Solutions for making a Green Building and also showcasing the New technology available.

Themes for the week:

Every Day we have a Theme depicted to our Envrionment and Buildings where we will be Highlighting some stories, Case studies of some projects Offers and Discounts for Sustainable Products and also some exciting offers in which any one can participate. Below you can find themes for the week :

  • September 23 – Energy Efficiency
  • September 24 – Water Efficiency & Quiz
  • September 25 – Building Envelope
  • September 26 – Waste Management & Practices
  • September 27 – Soil & Resources & Social Campaign
  • September 28 – Renewable Energy
  • September 29 – New Sustainable Technology & Launch of New Product

Do Visit and share your projects, stories or any new technology related to buildings and start the writing here – https://econaur.com/sign-up/. Do visit Econaur for other updates related to Sustainable Buildings.

Monday Flashback #26 — Bombay House, Mumbai — Econaur

In this week’s Monday Flashback we feature the Flashback Sustainable Story of Bombay House, Bombay House is a historic privately owned building in Fort, Mumbai, India that serves as the head office of the Tata Group.

Situated near Flora Fountain, it was completed in 1924 and has been the Tata Group’s headquarters ever since. The building is a four-story colonial structure built with Malad stone and was designed by Scottish architect George Wittet, who designed over 40 buildings for the group and later became the head of Tata Engineering Company Limited, now Tata Motors.

The building houses the office of chairman and all top directors of Tata Sons, the holding company. Core companies of the group-Tata Motors, Tata Steel, Tata Chemicals, Tata Power, Tata Industries, Tata airlines, and Trent-operate out of the Bombay House.

Bombay House — located on Homi Modi Street ((after the noted industrialist and banker associated with the Tatas) in Fort — was built on the two plots of land bought by Sir Dorabji Tata, the group’s second Chairman and Jamsetji Tata’s elder son, from the Bombay Municipality in 1920. The building was designed by the well-known architect, George Wittet, who was also the architect of the Gateway of India, the Prince of Wales Museum (now called Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya) and other iconic buildings of Mumbai.

The overhaul of the Bombay House office was led by architect and urban conservationist Brinda Somaya, of Somaya and Kalappa Consultants. In March 2014, it became the first heritage structure in the country to get a gold rating as a green, environmentally friendly building, awarded by the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC), the Indian chapter of the US Green Building Council.1/4

The staircase at Bombay House, Mumbai

Inside the Renovated and Hi-Tech Bombay House

The ground floor of Bombay House has been converted into a shared space housing an in-house coffee lounge, informal breakout places, and the Tata Experience Centre (TXC). TXC, a digital museum, is aimed at giving visitors an immersive experience into the world of Tata using digital technologies for effective storytelling. In a first for Bombay House, a kennel has been created for the canine friends who have been an integral part of the building for decades. The four floors of the building house offices of major Tata organizations. The historic boardroom on the fourth floor has been restored to its original beauty with only technology being a new addition.

The new technology set up in the building has been designed to create digital workplaces with seamless integration. Each floor has digital meeting rooms with immersive technology to enable seamless collaboration. A custom-made app has been developed to bring together all the technology controls through an intuitive and simple interface. The four-story Bombay House is owned by The Associated Building Company, part of the Tata Group.

Bombay House is the only heritage building in the country to receive ‘Platinum Rating’ by the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC), under their Existing Building rating system, Bombay House has received this rating for continuously implementing measurable strategies and solutions in five categories: site & facility management, water efficiency, energy efficiency, health & comfort, and innovation.

The project was implemented with the support of occupants of the building, The Associated Building Company Limited (ABCL), a Tata group company, responsible for the building, and Eco first Services, the sustainability arm of Tata Consulting Engineers Limited, which works in the area of building retro-commissioning and facilitation.

Govt. Involves to Make Sustainable Cooling Hubs for Communities

Experts from the University of Birmingham are to work with groups in India to explore how sustainable cooling can help Indian farming communities.

Launching the project on World Refrigeration Day (June 26) with a workshop in New Delhi, sustainable cooling experts will look at ways to reduce food waste, increase farmers’ income and meet rural communities’ cooling needs in an affordable and sustainable way. It intends to begin by developing ways of integrating food cold chains with other cold-dependent services such as community health facilities, social facilities such as creches and even emergency services.

Researchers from the Birmingham Energy Institute, Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, and the Centre for Environment Education (CEE) in India are supported by the Shakti Foundation and will join efforts with India’s National Centre for Cold-chain Development (NCCD) in this new project.

Representatives from Government, farming communities, NCCD and agri-business will take part in the one-day event to kick off the programme to deliberate on the concept of Community Cooling Hubs. A second event is being held in Pune to engage with farmer and civil society organisations.

The participants believe that creating Cooling Hubs as business units could meet the livelihood, nutrition, employment, and education requirements of the communities. Using appropriate technology and business models, it says, will help to remove barriers that stop subsistence farmers from using temperature-controlled logistics. These Hubs can also be deployed to provide the local community access to other refrigeration dependant services.

With up to 40% of food in India lost post-harvest because of lack of cold chain, the University of Birmingham is proposing a radical approach to cooling provision, where cold chains meet the wider community’s cooling needs in a clean, affordable and sustainable way. 

“Cooling hubs could support farmers, whilst ensuring that communities have continuing access to life-saving medicines and properly cooled health facilities and community services,” said the University’s professor Toby Peters.

This project will explore how temperature-controlled food pack-houses could innovate to hybridise and employ technologies to meet other community-based cold needs.

The cooling system could be used to cool a community hall to serve as a crèche for infants or elderly; perhaps providing a schoolroom for classes on the hottest days of the year. Vaccines and medicines could be safely stored at these hubs for local health care services.

The Hubs could host secondary agricultural activities that utilise local resources in terms of labour and farm output, such as processing milk into cheese or yoghurt, making jams and pickles, and Hindu holistic medicines. They would be employment hubs for the local community.

“Community cooling hubs take forward refrigeration from the immediate realm of cooling machines, into the dimension of collaborative technologies and models to drive a weightier wellbeing,” said NCCD CEO Professor Pawanexh Kohli.

The project follows the University of Birmingham’s partnership earlier in the year with the World Bank Group and UK Department of Business Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to host a global Clean Cooling Congress around sustainable, accessible cooling for all who need it – without over-heating the planet.

Experts at Birmingham plan to work with the NCCD and others, over a period of 12 months with farming communities in the state of Maharashtra. They will be supported by colleagues from Heriot-Watt University, the University of Edinburgh and ImechE.

Be the Part of Sand Free Campaign by Econaur !

sandfree challange

Modern forms of human existence, associated with rapid economic development, have contributed to an over-exploitation of renewable natural resources such as land and forests, and the exhaustion of non-renewable resources such as minerals and fossil fuels.

We have impacted the natural resources to a great extent for our own greed. To prevent the coming generation from the depletion of the resources and to give them a better environment we need to adapt the “Sustainable Measures” in construction.

The primary in this is the use of sand. We need to stop sand mining and adopt the measures that are “Sand free” as only this can provide us a sustainable Life. From forcing the river to change its course, to affecting the groundwater tables and adversely impacting the habitat of micro-organisms, the ramifications of illegal sand mining are many.

Sand is important for ground water recharge, on a riverbed it acts as a link between the flowing river and the water table and is part of the aquifer,” said Manoj Misra of the NGO Yamuna Jiye Abhiyan. “We have seen the impact of tampering with the rivers and their resources in the recent Uttarakhand floods. When sand and boulders are removed in an unimpeded way using heavy machines, the erosion capacity of the river increases. Sand and boulders prevent the river from changing the course and act as a buffer for the riverbed.”

As unplanned removal of sand has severe impacts on our bio-diversity: “There are a lot of micro-organisms that are not visible and widely known, but are critical to soil structure and fertility. When we dredge sand, we literally take away their habitat,”

To stop this take the sand free challenge and pledge to stop the sand mining and adopting the sustainable measures for construction and saving the environment and believe in green.

#GO SANDFREE

Submit Your Inquiry For Sand Free Plaster Click Here.

#SANDFREE CHALLENGE PARTICIPATION RULES:

The following are the categories to submit your projects:

1. PROJECTS-
To be a part of this your project should be unique and is promoting the “sandfree” idea. There can be both existing and new projects that depicts and promote the Sand free Environment.

2. VIDEOS-
In this category you can submit your video or your group video where in you are supporting the idea of the environmentbased on Sandfree or telling about the advantages of the sandfree Products. It could be both short or illustrated video.
You can either send us your video or tag us on Social Media Platforms @Econaur and #SANDFREECHALLENGE.

3.IMAGES
To take a part you can submit any image depicting and impacting the sandfree environment and spreading the awareness of the same.
You can either send us your images or tag us on Social Media Platforms @Econaur and #SANDFREECHALLENGE.

4.BLOGS/ARTICLES-
In this category unique blog or article showing the impacts and throwing some light on the sandfree sustainable products and their uses and why people need to stop using the sand and start believing in healthy environment will be appreciated.
You can either send us your blogs/articles or tag us on Social Media Platforms @Econaur and #SANDFREECHALLENGE.

5.UNIQUE SANDFREE IDEA-
In this category you can submit your unique idea/ project idea where in we can make the construction sandfree. The project and the idea will be displayed on our website.

#The best three from all the categories will be chosen randomly.
#The winners will get the Vouchers/Award/Visit to the factory.

#TAKE THE CHALLENGE AND SPREAD THE AWARENESS!
#BE A PART NOW!
#SUBMIT YOUR UNIQUE IDEA/IMAGE/VIDEO/ARTICLE!

This challenge and initiative is taken up Perlcon and Econaur as its time to stop the use of SAND and use the products which have no severe impacts on the Environment and that can act as an alternative for the same.

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